Kate wraps up as she braces the elements with William in chilly 1C temperature

Kate in Canada

Kate wrapped up in a scarlet Carolina Herrera coat

William and Kate recreated an historic moment when the Queen visited the old telegraph office in the frontier town in 1959. They used the old telegraph machine, which has been modified to turn Morse Code into tweets on the social media website Twitter.

Their historic tweet, which came almost two years after the Queen sent her first tweet from the Science Museum in London simply said: “THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE, SEPTEMBER 2016, WHITEHORSE YUKON”. 

It was the first one on the new Telegraph to Tweet service in Whitehorse.

It was just above freezing but the welcome was warm from thousands who turned out to greet the couple in the Yukon’s capital and only city.

Wrapped up against the chilly 1C temperature in a scarlet Carolina Herrera coat, Kate joined William on a visit to a museum about the history of the city and the Yukon Territory.

[William] said he has some moves and [Kate] agreed

Carly Fredrickson

It was the start of a busy programme of events designed to give them a taste of the frontier spirit.

After a brief tour of the museum, the oldest in the town, where they learned about the history of the Yukon region and its people, the Duke and Duchess walked through an exhibit of stuffed animals – including bear and caribou – to meet with representatives from a cultural language programme which is taking place in schools across the area. Here they met with Mike Parkhill author of the children’s book ‘Hide and Peek’ which is used in schools to teach children the native language Southern Tutchone.

The programme is supported by the Prince of Wales’ charity Prince’s Charities Canada.

The Duke seemed keen to learn more about the native language and asked Mr Parkhill: “Is it difficult to study? How do you pronounce that word?’ pointing to phonics on large boards. 

Kate said: “It’s great to share other languages.” She speaks French, which she studied at school, but not as well as William, whose poor accent was criticised when he made a speech in Victoria.

Will and Kate in Canada

Prince William and Kate are on a Royal visit to Canada

The couple sat down on a log to join the schoolchildren for a story telling session with ‘Grandma’ Lorraine Allen, who translated the book.

The book opens with a character called William the Moose, which prompted William and Kate to burst out laughing. Another character was a sleepy bear. 

“There’s a few sleepy bears here,” William joked as he pointed to some of the children, aged 3-5.

After visiting the MacBride Museum, they went to the newly restored telegraph office and then on a walkabout through downtown Whitehorse, where a street festival was underway.

Yukon’s Department of Education brought hundreds of schoolchildren into the city’s downtown to see the royals.

The second in line to the throne and his wife were welcomed to Whitehorse after earlier visiting Kelowna in British Columbia. The royal couple spent Tuesday night at a hotel in Whitehorse before going to the MacBride Museum on Wednesday morning.

The two hour flight northwards took them to an area where the northern lights can be seen in the early hours of the morning at this time of year but it was too cloudy for the couple to get a good view in the city.

When they arrived at Whitehorse Airport from Kelowna  on Tuesday night they were greeted by the  Governor-General of Canada David Johnston and his wife Sharon and a large number of dignitaries.

Before William inspected an honour guard made up of Canadian Rangers and Junior Rangers Mr Johnston gave a brief speech and told the royal couple: “Welcome to northern Canada. This is a vast and important part of the country, that’s home to a truly wonderful people.

“Something about this part of the country humbles and inspires us and forces us to discover new things.”

Kate in Canada

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The Duchess agreed that Prince William is a good dancer

Kate in Canada

The royal couple visited the MacBride Museum

They were treated to a cultural evening of country singing, dancing and stories featuring  local musicians and performers, as well as First Nations art and other exhibits.

Whitehorse, named after the White Horse Rapids for their resemblance to the mane of a white horse, was incorporated as a city  in 1950 and is located at kilometre 1426 on the Alaska Highway in southern Yukon.

Around 100,000 prospectors  set up camp in the Whitehorse area after the discovery of gold in the Klondike in August 1896 and soon discovered copper nearby in the hills to the west.

After watching a cultural performance, William boasted he was a good dancer and said he wanted to join in with a street dance performance.

Carly Fredrickson, 22, from Whitehorse was among young people performing for the couple at the cultural centre.

She said: “They were really impressed and they made jokes about how he’s a really good dancer and he wanted to get up and dance with us.

“He said he has some moves and she agreed.

“He said he did want to get up and dance while we were performing.”

After a brief tour of the museum, the oldest in the town, where they learned about the history of the Yukon region and its people, the Duke and Duchess walked through an exhibit of stuffed animals – including bear and caribou – to meet with representatives from a cultural language programme which is taking place in schools across the area. Here they met with Mike Parkhill author of the children’s book ‘Hide and Peek’ which is used in schools to teach children the native language Southern Tutchone.

The programme is supported by the Prince of Wales’ charity Prince’s Charities Canada.

The Duke seemed keen to learn more about the native language and asked Mr Parkhill: “Is it difficult to study? How do you pronounce that word?’ pointing to phonics on large boards. 

Kate said: “It’s great to share other languages.” She speaks French, which she studied at school, but not as well as William, whose poor accent was criticised when he made a speech in Victoria.

The couple sat down on a log to join the schoolchildren for a story telling session with ‘Grandma’ Lorraine Allen, who translated the book.

The book opens with a character called William the Moose, which prompted William and Kate to burst out laughing. Another character was a sleepy bear. 

“There’s a few sleepy bears here,” William joked as he pointed to some of the children, aged 3-5.

After visiting the MacBride Museum, they went to the newly restored telegraph office and then on a walkabout through downtown Whitehorse, where a street festival was underway.

“Ah,there’s a spelling mistake,” William joked as Doug Bell, a 90-year-old former radio operator with the Department of Transport, typed out the message in Morse Code. He last sent a telegram in 1947. William and Kate simultaneously hit the ‘send’ button.  

“Wow that’s amazing,” said Kate marvelling at the telegraphic office  which the Queen visited in 1959.

Mr Bell, a former Commissioner of Yukon, went on to tell the couple about the time he met Charles and Diana in the early 80s when the Prince and Princess of Wales were in Ottawa. 

Mr Bell told the Duke:” I met your parents” to which William replied: “It seems pretty much everyone has met my family here.”

Mr Bell told William how he had met Charles and Diana in 1981 during a line up at a dinner in Ottawa.

“I asked your father if he’d been to Yukon and he said no, and I said we ought to do something about that so I called the Governor General and we made arrangements (for them to visit). Then I got a call saying ‘They can’t go, the Princess is pregnant.’

Most of Yukon’s 37,000 inhabitants live in Whitehorse. The territory covers 483,450 square kilometres, an area larger than California – or Belgium, Denmark, Germany, and the Netherlands combined.